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erp7e
12-05-2003, 02:46 AM
There are several bills being thrown around the Senate floor right now, most notably S. 722, that seek to essentially ban the OTC sale of many dietary supplements as we know them, including prohormones and ephedrine.

I urge everybody (who's a U.S. citizen) to go to www.congress.org and find the addresses of your Senators. Write them a letter (snail mail gets taken much more seriously) telling them why you are opposed to bills like S. 722. The infringement on our liberty to make our own decisions as responsible adults about the foods and supplements we consume is ridiculous.

Also point out in your letter that these supplements are far safer than the media has characterized them to be. Aspirin causes roughly 100 deaths a year in the United States, yet there is no move to take that off the shelf. The simple fact is that with any supplement or drug, there is the potential for abuse and misuse.

Express support for S. 1538, the DSHEA Full Implementation and Enforcement Act. It clarifies and solidifies the laws put forth in 1994's DSHEA and protects our right to choose our supplements without government interference.

Take action! If you don't say anything, you're not participating in our so-called democracy. It's bad enough we let the U.S. PATRIOT Act get passed...

alanjlamore
01-03-2004, 05:07 PM
I wish I read this a few weeks ago!

I'll still try writing and see if it helps.

Even if it doesn't, I will have more of a right to complain because I tried to do something about it instead of sitting by and watching our rights be taken away from us little by little.

Better late than never, I hope.

WillBrink
01-03-2004, 05:48 PM
Originally posted by erp7e
There are several bills being thrown around the Senate floor right now, most notably S. 722, that seek to essentially ban the OTC sale of many dietary supplements as we know them, including prohormones and ephedrine.

I urge everybody (who's a U.S. citizen) to go to www.congress.org and find the addresses of your Senators. Write them a letter (snail mail gets taken much more seriously) telling them why you are opposed to bills like S. 722. The infringement on our liberty to make our own decisions as responsible adults about the foods and supplements we consume is ridiculous.

Also point out in your letter that these supplements are far safer than the media has characterized them to be. Aspirin causes roughly 100 deaths a year in the United States, yet there is no move to take that off the shelf. The simple fact is that with any supplement or drug, there is the potential for abuse and misuse.

Express support for S. 1538, the DSHEA Full Implementation and Enforcement Act. It clarifies and solidifies the laws put forth in 1994's DSHEA and protects our right to choose our supplements without government interference.

Take action! If you don't say anything, you're not participating in our so-called democracy. It's bad enough we let the U.S. PATRIOT Act get passed...

Yes folks, if you care AT ALL about the supps you take, follow the above instructions. Don't wait for some one else to care or do it for you!!!!! I promise you (and I have NEVER been wrong about this type of thing), they wont stop with ephedrine and Andro products if they get that passed. You have been warned!!!!

ray2nite
01-03-2004, 05:49 PM
I donít know if snail mail is taken more seriously than e-mail or not. But I do know that e-mail is mush easier. And I don mean easier just for the sender. It is easier for the receiver to receive e-mail. They donít have to sort it, move it, assemble it, open it, and store it. E-mail is not nearly as likely to get lost or misplaced. And, in my experience, e-mail is almost always answered.

What I do know is that everyone should take these issues seriously and let their representatives know Ė by whatever means -- that we do not want our freedoms of choice dictated by government agencies.

erp7e
01-04-2004, 12:47 AM
In the professional world, email is seen as a relatively impersonal form of communication. Sure, it's easier. What's easier isn't always what's most effective. For whatever it's worth, I wrote to both of my Virginia Senators and they each replied. They seemed receptive to my concerns, surprisingly. They don't seem sold either way on the issue. I think there's still hope; but there has to be a public push the other way if we want them to stop at ephedrine (I think prohormones will go too; let's at least save creatine).