PDA

View Full Version : Good Bye DHEA?



Andrew_389
06-16-2005, 04:12 PM
I don't take it myself, but this was posted on the 1fast (bulknutrition) site.

Just think, if this passes, anyone who has taken DHEA in the past would have to answer 'yes' to the question: 'have you ever taken a classified anabolic steroid?'

What a joke.



On May 26, Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) introduced a bill that would ban DHEA, a vital dietary supplement that provides many important health benefits. Last year the government banned prohormone and ephedra supplements, and they won?t rest until all nutritional supplements are regulated and sold by big pharmaceutical companies. This is our last chance to prevent Congress from taking DHEA off our shelves and to stop these ill-informed politicians in their tracks.

Your help is needed immediately! Join us along with the Sports & Fitness Supplement Association (SFSA) in sending a message to Washington today. Take 60 seconds to send lawmakers an e-mail as described below, and together we can keep this safe and effective dietary supplement legal and preserve your freedom to choose dietary supplements.

Why Should We Oppose This Bill?
This legislation, S. 1137, would classify DHEA as an anabolic steroid, adding it to the list of controlled substances and removing it from the market. Similar legislation is expected soon in the House of Representatives.

DHEA is not an anabolic steroid. It is a naturally occurring hormone that offers a wide range of benefits, including maintaining muscle tissue and strong bones, boosting immunity, and improving mood and sleep patterns. Further studies suggest DHEA may be helpful for such conditions as obesity, cancer, and Alzheimer?s disease. DHEA dietary supplements, which have been on the market for more than 20 years, are derived from a plant in the wild yam family.

This legislation claims to prevent abuse of steroids by athletes. However, DHEA, unlike androstenedione and other hormone precursors closer to testosterone, does not have a marked effect in building muscle or enhancing performance. Researchers at Harvard University conducted surveys of weightlifters and other athletes and found that DHEA is rarely ? if ever ? used by athletes for performance enhancement.

WillBrink
06-16-2005, 04:58 PM
I don't take it myself, but this was posted on the 1fast (bulknutrition) site.

Just think, if this passes, anyone who has taken DHEA in the past would have to answer 'yes' to the question: 'have you ever taken a classified anabolic steroid?'

What a joke.



On May 26, Sen. Charles Grassley (R-Iowa) introduced a bill that would ban DHEA, a vital dietary supplement that provides many important health benefits. Last year the government banned prohormone and ephedra supplements, and they won?t rest until all nutritional supplements are regulated and sold by big pharmaceutical companies. This is our last chance to prevent Congress from taking DHEA off our shelves and to stop these ill-informed politicians in their tracks.

Your help is needed immediately! Join us along with the Sports & Fitness Supplement Association (SFSA) in sending a message to Washington today. Take 60 seconds to send lawmakers an e-mail as described below, and together we can keep this safe and effective dietary supplement legal and preserve your freedom to choose dietary supplements.

Why Should We Oppose This Bill?
This legislation, S. 1137, would classify DHEA as an anabolic steroid, adding it to the list of controlled substances and removing it from the market. Similar legislation is expected soon in the House of Representatives.

DHEA is not an anabolic steroid. It is a naturally occurring hormone that offers a wide range of benefits, including maintaining muscle tissue and strong bones, boosting immunity, and improving mood and sleep patterns. Further studies suggest DHEA may be helpful for such conditions as obesity, cancer, and Alzheimer?s disease. DHEA dietary supplements, which have been on the market for more than 20 years, are derived from a plant in the wild yam family.

This legislation claims to prevent abuse of steroids by athletes. However, DHEA, unlike androstenedione and other hormone precursors closer to testosterone, does not have a marked effect in building muscle or enhancing performance. Researchers at Harvard University conducted surveys of weightlifters and other athletes and found that DHEA is rarely ? if ever ? used by athletes for performance enhancement.


As I predicted, emboldened by their successful removal of andro supp and ephedra, less controversial supps like DHEA are now on their hit list. I have never taken an andro supp in my life, nor am I a particularly big fan of andro, but I knew it was a slippery slope from what I didnít use (andro or ephedra) to what I did use (DHEA, creatine, etc.) and recommended people contact their reps regarding this issue. Some took the ďI donít use andro, why should I care?Ē attitude. Donít think for a second that creatine and many other favorite supps wont be on their hit list if DHEA is successfully removed from the market, even though it has 20 plus years of safety data.

Andrew_389
06-16-2005, 05:13 PM
I would think that this should meet some stiff opposition considering that most of the people taking this are are men in their 40's, 50's and 60's for health reasons and usually NOT by bodybuilders for the purpose of adding lean mass or reducing fat. I've heard though the grape vine that LEF is taking actions to prevent this from going through. I think awareness is key as the gov. is trying to slip this one though un-noticed. It's been tabled for 3 weeks now and this was the first I've heard of it.

Will, maybe you could find out more through your connections at LEF?


Andrew

elissalowe
06-16-2005, 05:16 PM
It's true...here's the bill: http://www.govtrack.us/data/us/bills.text/109/s1137.pdf which was co-sponsored by John McCain (R-AZ) and George Allen (R-VA).

Here's the link to SOS (from 1fast400.com): http://www.saveoursupplements.org/

elissalowe
06-16-2005, 05:22 PM
The push for this isn't just coming from the meddling feds, however...from an article in "NCAA News" (dated January 5, 2004):

"In a December 1 letter to Biden, NCAA President Myles Brand expressed his strong support for the legislation.

"This legislation is vital to the student-athlete and public welfare because although steroid precursors are as dangerous as illegal anabolic steroids, they are not only legal, but free from federal regulation," Brand said.

"These supplements can cause physical harm and eligibility problems for student-athletes," he said. "Since these supplements are not only legal, but easily obtained, a student-athlete ingesting the supplement could easily assume that they are merely taking a legal dietary supplement, when in fact they are ingesting the functional equivalent of a harmful anabolic steroid, a controlled substance."

Brand went on to say that the NCAA and its member institutions would support future legislation that also eliminates dehyroepiandrosterone, or DHEA, a precursor to testosterone, from the over-the-counter supplement market. The bill, as currently proposed, does not include DHEA."

Andrew_389
06-16-2005, 06:34 PM
What a bunch of clowns.

Don't feel bad, I think it's a controlled substance here in Canada as well although I'm sure I've seen it at health food stores around town. I got this statement off of a web-site:

"Certain countries including Australia, Canada and Norway have classified DHEA as a controlled substance. Although it appears that Australia and Canada have accepted that 7-keto does not convert to testosterone and therefore have declassified it."


Andrew

claytid
06-16-2005, 10:57 PM
From personal experience, I'm of the opinion that Brand is a total asshole.

Only slightly related, if you want a laugh, have a look what the NCAA allows member institutes to stock in their training pantries. They put limits on how much protein a shake/drink/bar can contain and on the use of individual aa's. So you can stock "energy" bars but only if they contain below a certain percentage of protein. Otherwise, you've violated yet another rule from the most bloated rulebook in all of sports.

swampratt
07-08-2005, 03:36 PM
My question has to do with Random drug testing. My company does random testing for drugs and alcohol. If I am tested and taking DHEA will it show up?

elissalowe
07-08-2005, 04:06 PM
My question has to do with Random drug testing. My company does random testing for drugs and alcohol. If I am tested and taking DHEA will it show up?
No.

As far as employment drug testing is concerned, most employers screen for the five types of psychoactive drugs identified by NIDA (National Institute of Drug Abuse). These are: marijuana, cocaine, amphetamines, opiates, and phencyclidine. Some will also screen for frequently abused prescription drugs. An example of one such commercial test is here: http://www.craigmedical.com/drug_test_10.htm These drugs and their metabolites are not chemically related to DHEA, or any of its metabolites, so a false positive result is extremely unlikely. False positives are more likely to be caused by ingestion of poppy seeds (http://www.snopes.com/toxins/poppy.htm) or hemp foods (http://www.naihc.org/hemp_information/content/THC_emp_drug_testing.html). FYI, ephedra/ephedrine use can generate false-positive results for amphetamine use in some assays.

swampratt
07-08-2005, 04:14 PM
Thanks for the information. Sometimes I get concerned that the Supp's we take will show on a random and then I have to fight the good fight as to why I would test possitive

Thanks again

erp7e
07-09-2005, 01:55 AM
I don't care about DHEA specifically, but I wrote my Senators and congressman about this bill because of the principle - I'm absolutely sick of our personal liberties being taken away. I STRONGLY ENCOURAGE EVERYONE to write their Senators and reps about this. The ONLY way we can beat this is if they think they'll lose votes and/or money.

Believe it or not, one of our biggest allies in this fight that actually has resources is the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU). I wrote them a letter too, explaining why this cause is worth fighting for based on protecting personal liberties. I'm going to try to organize some type of committee on this issue, as a physician maybe they'll take me semi-seriously. We have to fight fire with fire.

ray2nite
07-10-2005, 07:04 PM
Good for you erp. I hope you get some action on that.

I always write my senator and congressman when these bills come up but there are just too many people that are apathetic or brainwashed by the system. In the long run, we are slowly losing our rights and freedoms.

WillBrink
07-10-2005, 07:51 PM
Good for you erp. I hope you get some action on that.

I always write my senator and congressman when these bills come up but there are just too many people that are apathetic or brainwashed by the system. In the long run, we are slowly losing our rights and freedoms.

"First they arrested the Communists but I was not a Communist, so I did
nothing. Then they came for the Social Democrats - but I was not a Social
Democrat, so I did nothing. Then they arrested the trade unionists - and I
did nothing because I was not one. And then they came for the Jews and
then the Catholics, but I was neither a Jew nor a Catholic and I did
nothing. At last they came and arrested me - and there was no one left to
do anything about it." -- Reverend Martin Niemoller, German Protestant clergyman,
recounting his experience with the Nazi regime in his country.

elissalowe
07-11-2005, 02:47 AM
I don't care about DHEA specifically, but I wrote my Senators and congressman about this bill because of the principle - I'm absolutely sick of our personal liberties being taken away. I STRONGLY ENCOURAGE EVERYONE to write their Senators and reps about this. The ONLY way we can beat this is if they think they'll lose votes and/or money.

This article: http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2004/mar2004_cover_dhea_01.htm contains some good "talking points" for people who are interested in writing their representatives about this issue. SOS provides some pre-written points, but IMO, these types of mailings are less likely to be taken seriously.

erp7e
07-11-2005, 03:57 AM
Agreed - much better to use your own words. I've just gotten to the point where I realized that nobody is going to take a bunch of bodybuilders seriously. There needs to be more formal organization, and this is something I feel strongly about.

elissalowe
07-11-2005, 11:22 AM
Agreed - much better to use your own words. I've just gotten to the point where I realized that nobody is going to take a bunch of bodybuilders seriously. There needs to be more formal organization, and this is something I feel strongly about.
Quite so - no one is likely to take a bunch of bodybuilders seriously...which is ironic when you think about it, given that bber's as a group are considerably healthier than the general population.

There is some formal organization via industry groups such as the Council for Responsible Nutrition and the Coalition to Preserve DSHEA...but it's not likely to be enough, since even consumer groups like Public Citizen and Center for Science in the Public Interest are in favor of "Nanny State" interventions and support either the "reform" or repeal of DSHEA - which, in the end, is what this is really all about. It's just being done surgically - one small bit at a time.

Unfortunately, the industry has done very little to police itself, so that over-the-top and bogus claims for miracles go unchallenged, and consumers have to rely on sites like this one (!!!) for access to reasonably reliable information. All the BS plays right into the hands of would-be regulators, who can claim legitimacy on the grounds that they are protecting people from being ripped-off. So you end up with foaming-at-the-mouth statements like this (taken from the AARP website):

"Our language on this matter must be unambiguous: there are no lifestyle changes, surgical procedures, vitamins, antioxidants, hormones or techniques of genetic engineering available today that have been demonstrated to influence the processes of aging. We strongly urge the general public to avoid buying or using products or other interventions from anyone claiming that they will slow, stop or reverse aging."

(emphasis mine - from "51 Top Scientists Blast Anti-Aging Idea" (http://www.aarp.org/bulletin/yourhealth/a2003-07-29-aging_reverse.html))

"No lifestyle changes?" Excuse me? This is - if anything - just as irresponsible, but because spokesmen like this are "protecting" the public, anyone who says differently looks like a shill for the supp industry.

Those of us who are educated consumers need to demand more accountability from the industry, concomitant with political action to preserve our right to choose.