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plague
07-18-2005, 08:07 PM
Well, I am happy to say my boy has taken a keen interest in weight lifting now. He is 14 turning 15 next month. He has been coming to the gym steady with me and on his own accord. I have just been giving him some lighter full body routines for a start and has gained some weight in the meantime. He really likes it. He is recording stats and progress and really concentrating on form not how much he is lifting. He is also learning nutrition as we go in a non chalant kind of way. Rather than ramming knowledge down his throat I casually ask him "why are we eating eggs? and he'll answer protein. "Why are we eating oatmeal? " He says" complex carbos, man, why do you keep asking me this stuff"... :D

Anyhoo, I am a big believer that if kids become interested young it will stick for life if they realize the benefits of it. Just proud thats all! :p

elissalowe
07-18-2005, 08:50 PM
Well, I am happy to say my boy has taken a keen interest in weight lifting now. He is 14 turning 15 next month. He has been coming to the gym steady with me and on his own accord. I have just been giving him some lighter full body routines for a start and has gained some weight in the meantime. He really likes it. He is recording stats and progress and really concentrating on form not how much he is lifting. He is also learning nutrition as we go in a non chalant kind of way. Rather than ramming knowledge down his throat I casually ask him "why are we eating eggs? and he'll answer protein. "Why are we eating oatmeal? " He says" complex carbos, man, why do you keep asking me this stuff"... :D

Anyhoo, I am a big believer that if kids become interested young it will stick for life if they realize the benefits of it. Just proud thats all! :p
Awesome! :)

Number-One-Son (15) isn't quite as motivated as yours...but he has to learn this stuff from his Mom - not the best reinforcement for a tender young ego. :D

WillBrink
07-18-2005, 09:38 PM
Well, I am happy to say my boy has taken a keen interest in weight lifting now. He is 14 turning 15 next month. He has been coming to the gym steady with me and on his own accord. I have just been giving him some lighter full body routines for a start and has gained some weight in the meantime. He really likes it. He is recording stats and progress and really concentrating on form not how much he is lifting. He is also learning nutrition as we go in a non chalant kind of way. Rather than ramming knowledge down his throat I casually ask him "why are we eating eggs? and he'll answer protein. "Why are we eating oatmeal? " He says" complex carbos, man, why do you keep asking me this stuff"... :D

Anyhoo, I am a big believer that if kids become interested young it will stick for life if they realize the benefits of it. Just proud thats all! :p

When I was 14 and up to no good, my grandmother got me a membership to a gym. It gave me an outlet and kept me out of trouble. Rest is history.:D

plague
07-19-2005, 01:11 AM
When I was 14 and up to no good, my grandmother got me a membership to a gym. It gave me an outlet and kept me out of trouble. Rest is history.:D


I wish I had someone like your grandma that did the same. But then my family was too busy being up to no good..... :rolleyes: so they didnt have time or funds for me. Its interesting to othough because I had always had an interest in lifting as a kid, just never had the opportunity.

I am pretty happy about it actually, he really enjoys it and the guys really try to help him and encourage him.

He could be doing worse things thats for sure.

erp7e
07-24-2005, 08:26 PM
I actually never really lifted until I was 19, but I played sports my whole life. Probably my dad's influence - he thinks weight training will somehow turn you into a narcissistic musclebound neanderthal inflexible rigid dumbass, so I never was really exposed to it. He went with me to the gym one time and after watching me deadlift 315 (which is nowhere near my max) for reps, he was not impressed - he thought there was something seriously wrong with me. "Nobody should be lifting that much weight, it's just wrong." He keeps telling me that I have it all wrong - I should be sticking to 10 lb. dumbbells for high reps "to build strength." I'm 27 now but I still hear it. So good for you to let your kid in on the iron game. My thoughts on kids lifting is it is fine, as long as they already NEED to lift. In other words, if they are too weak to do 1-leg squats with bodyweight, there is no reason for external load. If they cannot do 12 chinups with bodyweight, there is no need for external load. And so on. I think kids should start with various calisthenics and bodyweight drills and only progress to weight training when they need to, which certainly by their mid-teens that would be well into the time for this.

I think it's important for kids to ENJOY physical activity - be it in the gym or elsewhere (preferably both). There is too much emphasis nowadays on everything being very competitive from a very young age, i.e. kids are 6 years old getting trophies, winning "championships," etc., then they burn out too early and hate physical activity as adults, get fat with health problems, etc. I actually see this phenomenon all the time with adults who are ex-athletes. I stick to exercise because I enjoy it and have my whole life. In Jozef Drabik's Children and Sports Training, he talks a great deal about the dangers of excessive emphasis on compeitiveness and "winning" as it relates to sports for kids at too young an age. This is a common mistake in America. Another big mistake is specialization too early. You shouldn't make your kid into a relief pitcher or a powerlifter, to the exclusion of all other sports, when he's 9 years old. Another point Drabik makes is the need for kids to have general physical preparedness in all different activities - this promotes a lifelong love of physical activity, improved health, and better performance in competitive sports, should they go that route, throughout their 20's and 30's.

plague
08-08-2005, 01:19 AM
I actually never really lifted until I was 19, but I played sports my whole life. Probably my dad's influence - he thinks weight training will somehow turn you into a narcissistic musclebound neanderthal inflexible rigid dumbass, so I never was really exposed to it. He went with me to the gym one time and after watching me deadlift 315 (which is nowhere near my max) for reps, he was not impressed - he thought there was something seriously wrong with me. "Nobody should be lifting that much weight, it's just wrong." He keeps telling me that I have it all wrong - I should be sticking to 10 lb. dumbbells for high reps "to build strength." I'm 27 now but I still hear it. So good for you to let your kid in on the iron game. My thoughts on kids lifting is it is fine, as long as they already NEED to lift. In other words, if they are too weak to do 1-leg squats with bodyweight, there is no reason for external load. If they cannot do 12 chinups with bodyweight, there is no need for external load. And so on. I think kids should start with various calisthenics and bodyweight drills and only progress to weight training when they need to, which certainly by their mid-teens that would be well into the time for this.

I think it's important for kids to ENJOY physical activity - be it in the gym or elsewhere (preferably both). There is too much emphasis nowadays on everything being very competitive from a very young age, i.e. kids are 6 years old getting trophies, winning "championships," etc., then they burn out too early and hate physical activity as adults, get fat with health problems, etc. I actually see this phenomenon all the time with adults who are ex-athletes. I stick to exercise because I enjoy it and have my whole life. In Jozef Drabik's Children and Sports Training, he talks a great deal about the dangers of excessive emphasis on compeitiveness and "winning" as it relates to sports for kids at too young an age. This is a common mistake in America. Another big mistake is specialization too early. You shouldn't make your kid into a relief pitcher or a powerlifter, to the exclusion of all other sports, when he's 9 years old. Another point Drabik makes is the need for kids to have general physical preparedness in all different activities - this promotes a lifelong love of physical activity, improved health, and better performance in competitive sports, should they go that route, throughout their 20's and 30's.


I never force. He is ready and out the door before I am! :D

He feels part of something, and the guys all know him now and help him. I certainly encourage him and he does very well, and he takes it serious. He doesnt lift alot of weight obviously, but he is getting stronger and his confidence is rising as well.

He could be doing worse things.