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WillBrink
12-18-2005, 09:04 PM
I recall someone had asked about sports nutrition certs. This new diploma offered by the IOC might be a good option. I can't vouch for it one way or another, but at least it has the backing of a group we have all heard of:


The International Olympic Committee is pleased to announce the launch of the IOC Diploma in Sports Nutrition, a two-year part-time distance learning opportunity for graduates of nutrition and exercise science courses who want to specialize in sports nutrition. The inaugural course will commence in April 2006 with a completion date of October 2007. The course will feature the input of a range of experts from a wide variety of areas of sports nutrition, to provide a truly international faculty. It will feature distance learning via innovative techniques, supported by web-based chats and discussion activities and an (optional) annual residential workshop. Details of the course can be found at www.sportsoracle.com http://www.sportsoracle.com. This site w! ill also host a range of education resources produced in conjunction with the IOC and International Sporting Organizations. We hope that members of Sports Dietitians Australia will be well served by these new education activities.

erp7e
12-19-2005, 06:02 AM
Interesting. I wonder if the curriculum will be related to this book:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0632050942/qid=1134968457/sr=1-6/ref=sr_1_6/103-3059243-6404603?s=books&v=glance&n=283155

I haven't read it, but I have Strength and Power in Sport, another book in the series (IOC Encyclopedia of Sports Medicine), which is outstanding.

JHalstead
12-19-2005, 01:03 PM
I recall someone had asked about sports nutrition certs. This new diploma offered by the IOC might be a good option. I can't vouch for it one way or another, but at least it has the backing of a group we have all heard of:


The International Olympic Committee is pleased to announce the launch of the IOC Diploma in Sports Nutrition, a two-year part-time distance learning opportunity for graduates of nutrition and exercise science courses who want to specialize in sports nutrition. The inaugural course will commence in April 2006 with a completion date of October 2007. The course will feature the input of a range of experts from a wide variety of areas of sports nutrition, to provide a truly international faculty. It will feature distance learning via innovative techniques, supported by web-based chats and discussion activities and an (optional) annual residential workshop. Details of the course can be found at www.sportsoracle.com http://www.sportsoracle.com. This site w! ill also host a range of education resources produced in conjunction with the IOC and International Sporting Organizations. We hope that members of Sports Dietitians Australia will be well served by these new education activities.

<sarcasm>If this is from the IOC will it include a segment on why steroids are banned and when to turn your head and look the other way? </sarcasm>

WillBrink
12-19-2005, 04:07 PM
<sarcasm>If this is from the IOC will it include a segment on why steroids are banned and when to turn your head and look the other way? </sarcasm>

Probably. I doubt anyone is going to learn anything other then the usual info from this cert, but people that would like a deploma of sorts in this area, it might be worth getting.

erp7e
12-21-2005, 05:23 AM
I think the rule goes, If someone is from North America, mere hearsay and circumstantial evidence is enough to strip all your records and ban you effectively for life (Tim Montgomery). If person is not North American, inject away!

Oh, and because some pro baseball players use steroids, it makes PERFECT SENSE to remove baseball from the Olympics, where the team is all collegiate players. Oh, and it makes even more sense to remove softball from the Olympics due to pro baseball's steroid use (yes, true story - no baseball or softball in '08 due to this reason, allegedly. Or is it because baseball is a predominantly North American/South American/Southeast Asian sport...and the IOC is so EuroCentric it is nauseating?)

For this reason I will not watch the '08 Olympics...if there was a way to hurt them financially I would.

That being said...the IOC Encyclopedias of Sport are outstanding, so perhaps the coursework would be above the usual food pyramid stuff.

JHalstead
12-21-2005, 12:59 PM
I just want to see Chellios and Schneider play defense so good for team USA (hockey) that they bring the gold back to America. The rest of the winter olympics don't do much for me, and summer olympics do even less.

alwaysimprove
12-21-2005, 06:01 PM
I think the US made a big mistake by not bringing Leetch though, he's probably the best US born defenceman in the NHL.

The gold is in America, in case you didn't know Canada is part of North America... I just wish Canada could send 3 hockey teams so that we could increase our medal count :)
More than one team is allowed in bobsled, why not hockey?

JHalstead
12-21-2005, 08:04 PM
Pfft. You silly Canadians and your hockey...

Who's on the Canadian hockey team this year, anyhow? I have not checked to find out, but I'm curious how many, if any, are coming from the Red Wings... especially since Yzerman is sidelined with a groin injury (or is he playing anyhow?).

alwaysimprove
12-21-2005, 10:57 PM
Yzerman withdrew his name, Shanahan and Draper might make the team, they will announce the team at 5:00 pm tonight, so in about 5 minutes...

JHalstead
12-21-2005, 11:47 PM
Hmm, that makes it hard to pick a team to root for... Oh wait, is Gretzky in charge of team Canada still? That makes it much easier for me, since I've never been able to stand the guy.

erp7e
12-25-2005, 09:19 PM
I'm out of the loop on hockey. Does Bobby Orr still play? :D

kimk8202
08-15-2008, 07:21 AM
hi will, i'm sure i remember in another post (that I now can't find) where you listed some other useful sports nutrition courses (ones that don't require a science or nutrition undergrad). If you can lead me in the right direction.... i think there was one that was a distance course?
sorry brain freeze.

WillBrink
08-15-2008, 09:06 PM
hi will, i'm sure i remember in another post (that I now can't find) where you listed some other useful sports nutrition courses (ones that don't require a science or nutrition undergrad). If you can lead me in the right direction.... i think there was one that was a distance course?
sorry brain freeze.

To be honest with you, it's not coming to me either. The ISSN has some good certs too, and that might be what you are thinking of, but not 100% on that.

elissalowe
08-15-2008, 09:29 PM
To be honest with you, it's not coming to me either. The ISSN has some good certs too, and that might be what you are thinking of, but not 100% on that.
There is really no such thing as a "good" cert that doesn't require either a 4 year degree or the equivalent in experience and other credentials. For example, to get a CISSN without a degree:


The individual must be practicing in the field for at least five years and be a paid member of The ISSN.
The individual must at least be certified as a trainer by the NSCA, ACE or ACSM (CPT or HFI respectively).
The individual must also have one or more of the following certifications in nutrition: HFI, CHES, ACE-Lifestyle & Weight Management, DTR, AFPA-nutrition, ISSA-nutrition, Penn-Foster School-nutrition.
Applicant MUST show proof of certification to the ISSN during the registration/application process. If no proof of certification is demonstrated, than the ISSN reserves the right to not allow the individual to take the certification, and we reserve the right to charge 25% of the certification fee as Administrative Costs.
The individual must have attended (with proof) at least three ISSN National Conferences in the past 4 years.


A good cert is "good" because it ensures that certain minimum standards for expertise are met.

But what she actually wrote was "courses" - so she may have meant basic classes where one can obtain a good working knowledge for personal use, vs. professional standing.

kimk8202
08-15-2008, 09:53 PM
sorry, i think the one i was thinking of was a 3 or 4 year degree, just by distance.
thanks guys for your help.

WillBrink
08-16-2008, 12:52 AM
sorry, i think the one i was thinking of was a 3 or 4 year degree, just by distance.
thanks guys for your help.

I'm sure they exist. For example, U of Bridgeport has an MS in Clinical Nutrition by distance:

http://www.bridgeport.edu/pages/3246.asp

That's an MS, which requires a 4 year degree, but I put it up as an example such things exist. It's important to make sure however they are accredited. For example the above is:

"The Human Nutrition Program is licensed and accredited by the Connecticut Board of Governors for Higher Education and the Commission on Institutions of Higher Education, New England Association of Schools and Colleges."

So yes, I believe you could get an accredited degree via distance learning, but it will take some looking into. I have never taken any online course work myself, so I can't speak from experience there. I do have some friends who got degrees that way and they were happy with the experience.

erp7e
08-17-2008, 08:53 PM
A four-year bachelor's in nutrition would be respectable for professional use. If you are just looking to learn more, I think there are probably online courses you can take. Distance learning is becoming more common.