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torelli
08-05-2003, 09:03 AM
Will or anyone else,

I was wondering how a person with so much knowledge on a subject that quite literally consumes us, you manage to stay mentally healthy when eating different foods that you may know are not optimal. I don't know if it sounds crazy or not, but for example if you sit down to a meal and know the negative side effects of eating the meal because it has x or y in it what response does it provoke mentally? Or has this never been a problem or thought? Any insight would be greatly appreciated, I find myself sometimes pondering the question more and more as I continue learning more.

WillBrink
08-05-2003, 04:09 PM
Originally posted by torelli
Will or anyone else,

I was wondering how a person with so much knowledge on a subject that quite literally consumes us, you manage to stay mentally healthy when eating different foods that you may know are not optimal. I don't know if it sounds crazy or not, but for example if you sit down to a meal and know the negative side effects of eating the meal because it has x or y in it what response does it provoke mentally? Or has this never been a problem or thought? Any insight would be greatly appreciated, I find myself sometimes pondering the question more and more as I continue learning more.


Ah, a great question. You have hit on something I have been talking about a long time. Success in life is all about balance. One has to make a conscious choice to be a balanced person, it does not just happen on its own. When I was younger, I lived. breathed, and slept bodybuilding. Pretty much the only thing I thought about was what new number I would get in the gym on some lift, what I was going to eat, and of course how much muscle I had added. I was in the same unbalanced narrow (read dysfunctional) world many other bodybuilders and athletes of all kinds live in. As time went on, I realized that my world had become very small and the world was far to large and had far too much to offer to live that life. I decided I would be a more balanced person even if it cost me some size and strength and believe you me, it did. However, I am far better off for it. I decided I would take walks even if it burned up some calories. If I missed a meal, I would not go into a fit, and if i missed a workout, I would live with it, and i would get back to reading books that did not have the words “anabolic” any where in the text! I recall doing a seminar where I made the comment that bodybuilders were by nature obsessive and they should read a book once in a while. A bunch of them raised their hands (clearly about to tell me about all the reading the did) and I said “but yes, how many of you read a book recently that didn't contains the words anabolic, hypertrophy, or size any where in the text?” They all put their hand down.

However, to be a success in any high level sport, it’s a huge challenge to be a balanced person. Top athletes generally do little but focus on how they are going to improve in their sport and little else. Bodybuilding in particular becomes all consuming. I have trained some of the top bodybuilders out there and know many more. They are some of the most obsessive, neurotic, dysfunctional people you will ever meet. Some of the Olympic level track athletes I worked with were just as bad. There is no doubt certain personality types are drawn to such things. Therefore, it’s a conscious decision we as people have to make regarding just how much emphasis we want to place on any one thing and what the cost to benefit of that decision is. There is no right answer per se, but I know what the right answer for me was. I see the same guys in the gym I saw ten years ago going no place and they always comment how much size i have lost, etc. Can’t say that makes me happy but I can assure you I would not be who I am today had I not made those changes.

Simon
08-05-2003, 04:17 PM
Originally posted by WillBrink
Ah, a great question. You have hit on something I have been talking about a long time. Success in life is all about balance. One has to make a conscious choice to be a balanced person, it does not just happen on its own. When I was younger, I lived. breathed, and slept bodybuilding. Pretty much the only thing I thought about was what new number I would get in the gym on some lift, what I was going to eat, and of course how much muscle I had added. I was in the same unbalanced narrow (read dysfunctional) world many other bodybuilders and athletes of all kinds live in. As time went on, I realized that my world had become very small and the world was far to large and had far too much to offer to live that life. I decided I would be a more balanced person even if it cost me some size and strength and believe you me, it did. However, I am far better off for it. I decided I would take walks even if it burned up some calories. If I missed a meal, I would not go into a fit, and if i missed a workout, I would live with it, and i would get back to reading books that did not have the words “anabolic” any where in the text! I recall doing a seminar where I made the comment that bodybuilders were by nature obsessive and they should read a book once in a while. A bunch of them raised their hands (clearly about to tell me about all the reading the did) and I said “but yes, how many of you read a book recently that didn't contains the words anabolic, hypertrophy, or size any where in the text?” They all put their hand down.

However, to be a success in any high level sport, it’s a huge challenge to be a balanced person. Top athletes generally do little but focus on how they are going to improve in their sport and little else. Bodybuilding in particular becomes all consuming. I have trained some of the top bodybuilders out there and know many more. They are some of the most obsessive, neurotic, dysfunctional people you will ever meet. Some of the Olympic level track athletes I worked with were just as bad. There is no doubt certain personality types are drawn to such things. Therefore, it’s a conscious decision we as people have to make regarding just how much emphasis we want to place on any one thing and what the cost to benefit of that decision is. There is no right answer per se, but I know what the right answer for me was. I see the same guys in the gym I saw ten years ago going no place and they always comment how much size i have lost, etc. Can’t say that makes me happy but I can assure you I would not be who I am today had I not made those changes.

Good post Will

torelli
08-05-2003, 08:46 PM
Yes, that is a good post Will,

thank you for your input. I am finding that it has to be a very conscious deciscion at times, and figuring out the balance is difficult. Though the negative consequences of being out of balance can really manifest itself in real life.

I think maybe one of the best ways to look at it is that there is a time and place for everything. Life fluctuates, and so does training. As a person you have to realize where you are at any given time amongst the fluctuations and "ride the wave."

I have read a lot of Frank Zane's work (even though I just turned 21 I love the old pro's) and his idea of seasonal training seems to me to hint at the idea of balance in life. I know today he preaches it more and more.

Thank you for your input it is nice to hear it from others.

:D