PDA

View Full Version : Busted supplement company



Ron
09-08-2003, 07:20 PM
I just caught the tail end of it on the news the other day, but some supplement company in San Fransico got raided.

What happened? What company? Why?

Anyone catch wind of it?

WillBrink
09-09-2003, 01:54 PM
Originally posted by Ronrat7
I just caught the tail end of it on the news the other day, but some supplement company in San Fransico got raided.

What happened? What company? Why?

Anyone catch wind of it?

Can't say it rings a bell. Supp companies do get raided. Some times for legit reasons, but more often then not, for bogus reasons when the FDA is looking for some PR or tp make an example of the supp company.

HugeDogg
09-10-2003, 05:37 AM
Balco Labs

WillBrink
09-10-2003, 01:40 PM
Originally posted by HugeDogg
Balco Labs

Balco labs? For what? I know the people there and they are far and away one of the more legit companies in terms of quality control, and lets face it, ZMA is not exactly crazy stuff. Sounds like a classic FDA PR thing.

bobdc
09-10-2003, 10:55 PM
Found this:

Raid on nutrition firm a battle in doping war
By Mark Zeigler
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

September 6, 2003

There are indications that a raid by federal agents Wednesday on a Bay Area sports nutrition company with a star-studded client list could have ramifications in the ongoing battle against doping in sports.

Dr. Don Catlin, who runs UCLA's sports drug lab and is regarded as one of the world's top anti-doping figures, confirmed yesterday that he has aided federal agents in their investigation of Balco Labs in Burlingame for more than a year. He also said the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has assisted in the probe.

The raid on Balco headquarters and owner Victor Conte's home was led by the Internal Revenue Service's Criminal Investigation Division and included members of the San Mateo County Narcotics Task Force. There also are published reports that agents entered a nearby gym and served warrants to Greg Anderson, the personal trainer for San Francisco Giants outfielder Barry Bonds, a Balco client.

IRS spokesman Mark Lessler said there had been "enforcement activity" Wednesday but would not elaborate on reports that dozens of agents were seen carrying boxes of material from the lab's headquarters.

"No arrests were made," Lessler said. "All the documents related to this have been sealed by the court."

A woman who answered the phone at Balco Labs said the company had no comment.

Conte founded Balco Labs in the 1980s and has become known in the industry for developing ZMA, a zinc and magnesium supplement he claims "is the only all-natural product that has been clinically proven to increase anabolic hormone levels and strength in trained athletes."

According to the company's Web site, its clients include entire NFL and NBA teams, numerous professional body builders and high-profile track stars such as Marion Jones, Tim Montgomery and Kelli White.

"I'm just shocked what they've been able to do for me," Bonds said in a recent story in Muscle & Fitness magazine.

WillBrink
09-11-2003, 12:10 AM
Originally posted by bobdc
Found this:

Raid on nutrition firm a battle in doping war
By Mark Zeigler
UNION-TRIBUNE STAFF WRITER

September 6, 2003

There are indications that a raid by federal agents Wednesday on a Bay Area sports nutrition company with a star-studded client list could have ramifications in the ongoing battle against doping in sports.

Dr. Don Catlin, who runs UCLA's sports drug lab and is regarded as one of the world's top anti-doping figures, confirmed yesterday that he has aided federal agents in their investigation of Balco Labs in Burlingame for more than a year. He also said the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency has assisted in the probe.

The raid on Balco headquarters and owner Victor Conte's home was led by the Internal Revenue Service's Criminal Investigation Division and included members of the San Mateo County Narcotics Task Force. There also are published reports that agents entered a nearby gym and served warrants to Greg Anderson, the personal trainer for San Francisco Giants outfielder Barry Bonds, a Balco client.

IRS spokesman Mark Lessler said there had been "enforcement activity" Wednesday but would not elaborate on reports that dozens of agents were seen carrying boxes of material from the lab's headquarters.

"No arrests were made," Lessler said. "All the documents related to this have been sealed by the court."

A woman who answered the phone at Balco Labs said the company had no comment.

Conte founded Balco Labs in the 1980s and has become known in the industry for developing ZMA, a zinc and magnesium supplement he claims "is the only all-natural product that has been clinically proven to increase anabolic hormone levels and strength in trained athletes."

According to the company's Web site, its clients include entire NFL and NBA teams, numerous professional body builders and high-profile track stars such as Marion Jones, Tim Montgomery and Kelli White.

"I'm just shocked what they've been able to do for me," Bonds said in a recent story in Muscle & Fitness magazine.

Thanx for the info. It appears drug related vs supp related.

erp7e
09-14-2003, 05:22 AM
Yeah, I don't think we're talking about magnesium here.

I think Bonds' personal trainer has been putting a little more than milk in Bonds' Wheaties, if you follow me.

bobdc
10-19-2003, 03:11 PM
I wonder if any "Big Names" will be implicated - or if their positive tests will be bought out by a certain shoe company...

U.S. Anti-Doping Agency says it has uncovered steroid 'conspiracy'
By Rob Gloster, Associated Press, 10/16/2003 21:33

Several track athletes tested positive for a steroid that until recently was undetectable and now face suspensions that could bar them from the 2004 Athens Olympics, the U.S. Anti-Doping Agency said Thursday.

USADA chief executive officer Terry Madden called it a widespread ''conspiracy'' involving chemists, coaches and athletes that was brought to the agency's attention by an anonymous tip.

He said the inquiry began in June and has expanded to other U.S. professional sports, but wouldn't give specifics. He also refused to give details about the athletes or say how many tested positive for the steroid, known as tetrahydrogestrinone, or THG.

''What we have uncovered appears to be intentional doping of the worst sort,'' Madden said in a statement before his conference call from USADA headquarters in Colorado Springs, Colo. ''This is a far cry from athletes accidentally testing positive as a result of taking contaminated nutritional supplements.

''Rather, this is a conspiracy involving chemists, coaches and certain athletes using what they developed to be `undetectable' designer steroids to defraud their fellow competitors and the American and world public who pay to attend sports events.''

Olympic athletes face drug tests at major competitions, as well as random testing between events. Their samples are divided in two and stored for future reference.

The athletes whose ''A'' samples revealed THG have been notified and will now have their ''B'' samples tested. If those are positive, a review process will begin. Appeals could last for months. Track athletes found to have used steroids would face two-year bans.

THG has a chemical structure similar to the banned anabolic steroids gestrinome and trenbolone, Madden said. Though THG is not specifically named as a banned substance in world track, it would be considered a related substance outlawed under the sport's doping rules.

''This is a serious warning for cheaters,'' said Dick Pound, chairman of the World Anti-Doping Agency. ''It shows that supposedly undetectable substances can be detected as new tests are developed.''

Madden said the USADA received a call from a man in June claiming to be a track coach. The caller named athletes he claimed were using a steroid that wouldn't be detected by tests then being used by the USADA. The man later sent the agency a syringe containing the substance, Madden said.

After determining the syringe contained THG, the USADA retested 350 urine samples taken from athletes at the U.S. track and field championships in June at Stanford, as well as 100 samples from random out-of-competition tests.

Madden said USADA contacted federal authorities with the findings.

The anonymous tipster, Madden said, identified the source of the THG as Victor Conte, founder of BALCO laboratory of Burlingame, Calif. The lab supplies nutritional guidance and supplements to athletes ranging from Barry Bonds to Bill Romanowski to Marion Jones.

''Everything that the coach has identified to us up to this time is true. We are fairly certain this substance came from Victor Conte and BALCO labs,'' said Madden, refusing to be specific.

Conte did not respond Thursday to an e-mail inquiry from The Associated Press, and calls to BALCO went unanswered.

In an e-mail to the San Francisco Chronicle and San Jose Mercury News, Conte denied BALCO was the source of the substance.

''In my opinion, this is about jealous competitive coaches and athletes that all have a history of promoting and using performance enhancing agents being 'completely hypocritical' in their actions,'' Conte said.

Agents from the Internal Revenue Service and a San Mateo County narcotics task force went to BALCO last month. No arrests were made, and IRS spokesman Mark Lessler wouldn't comment on the visit.

As part of the retesting of the samples from the U.S. track championships, Madden said, officials discovered several positive tests for the stimulant modafinil which sprinter Kelli White says she took for the sleep disorder narcolepsy.

White tested positive this summer at the world championships in Paris for modafinil, and it could cost her a pair of sprint gold medals. Her case is being reviewed by USADA.

USA Track & Field, in a statement, said it didn't know all the details of the anti-doping agency's probe but said those responsible ''should be held accountable for their actions.''

U.S. Olympic Committee spokesman Darryl Seibel said: ''We created USADA to be a leader in the fight against doping in sport. There is no issue of greater importance to the USOC and their effort underscores the commitment we've made.''

erp7e
10-19-2003, 11:52 PM
I should've got me some BALCO "ZMA" before everything hit the fan.

no23
02-19-2004, 01:09 PM
BTW - is Balco still trading regardless?

I guess not that it matters - I assume that companies who use the SNAC trademark can produce the copyrighted ZMA and other products without Balco being in existance or trading ... though certainly interesting.



[I will say though that my faith in SNAC and ZMA has been tested a bit by the scandal - ]

WillBrink
02-19-2004, 02:56 PM
Originally posted by no23
BTW - is Balco still trading regardless?

I guess not that it matters - I assume that companies who use the SNAC trademark can produce the copyrighted ZMA and other products without Balco being in existance or trading ... though certainly interesting.



[I will say though that my faith in SNAC and ZMA has been tested a bit by the scandal - ]

Not sure I follow by what you mean by "trading." As far as I know, Balco is still in business and will continue to be until the entire thing is finished one way or another. I don't personally see any connection to that particular scandle and their ZMA product.

erp7e
02-22-2004, 03:59 AM
I was joking that perhaps ZMA had a "special" ingredient, as the original Met-Rx allegedly did. Maybe it's all folklore.

Regardless, I wouldn't lose confidence in zinc and magnesium supplementation. Those are the two minerals I take in supplement form in addition to a multi. Zinc has been shown to boost immunity and testosterone levels. Magnesium is a catalyst for an enormous number of reactions in the body, and our heavily-processed diet tends to be deficient in it.